Building  Owners  and  Managers  Association  International

Building Owners and Managers Association International

National Energy Policy Position Paper

BOMA Position

BOMA International calls upon the federal government to enact a national energy policy which ensures all consumers have access to adequate supplies of reasonably priced energy by addressing the energy challenge from both the demand and supply perspective.

Background

At BOMA International’s Winter Business Meeting in January, 2001, BOMA’s Board of Governors unanimously passed a new policy resolution in support of a national energy policy to address the energy challenge through conservation and demand reduction. This position was later amended at the Winter Business Meeting in January, 2003. The position is as follows:

The Building Owners and Managers Association (BOMA) International, on behalf of America’s workforce – commercial building tenants – calls upon the federal government to enact a national energy policy which ensures all consumers have access to adequate supplies of reasonably priced energy by addressing the energy challenge from both the demand and supply perspective.

As both energy consumers and aggregators of energy use, the members of BOMA pledge to partner with government at the federal, state and local level, as well as with our tenants, to continue to address the energy challenge through conservation and demand reduction. In these efforts we will look to government as a resource partner for research and education on the efficient use of energy.

But we also wish to make clear that energy efficiency and conservation alone are not enough to overcome present and projected future energy shortages.

The Federal Government must implement a national energy policy, which guarantees all consumers have access to adequate supplies of reasonably priced energy. We believe this goal may be achieved only if the Federal government demonstrates a leadership role in:

  1. Identifying reliable sources of domestic and renewable energy;
  2. Eliminating unreasonable regulatory burdens and restrictions which inhibit the development of these energy sources;
  3. Identifying and eliminating regulatory structures which impose artificial pricing schemes or do not respect regional competitive advantages;
  4. Ensuring an uninterrupted transmission and distribution energy network based on regional requirements; and
  5. Protecting consumers in the absence of competitive market forces.

The Federal Government must preserve local legislative and regulatory accountability.

​This issue remains a high priority for the Bush Administration as well as Congress. Despite Congress’ inability to pass a broad energy policy bill in the 107th Congress, look to them to continue to debate the unresolved issues throughout the 108th Congress. Continued conflict throughout the Middle East will also ensure that the need to decrease the United States’ dependence on oversees oil sources will keep this issue in the spotlight.

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